1192 Experiential Learning Helps Students Understand Their Capacity

Sara Van Der Werf inspired me last year with her post titled Why You Need a PLAY TABLE in your mathematics classroom ASAP. I’ve seen merit in using play to teach and learn mathematics for some time now. What Sara’s post did was make me long to be back in a mathematics classroom so I could have such a play table!

Last week I started working at the American Academy of Innovation, a charter school nearby that engages students in learning through projects and other activities.

Each member of the faculty was given the assignment to make something that reflects his or her teaching philosophy. Here’s the one I put together:

On my display, I included the words, “Experiential Learning Helps Students Understand Their Capacity.” That’s my teaching philosophy.

The wording I used was intentional.

  •  “Their” might refer to the students or to the geometric solids.
  • “Capacity” has two appropriate definitions stated so perfectly by Google in the screenshot below:
    1) the ability or power the students “have to do, experience, or understand something”, and 2) the maximum amount the geometric solids can contain.

The scattered rice symbolizes that these learning experiences can sometimes be messy. We will learn more if we aren’t afraid to make mistakes or a little mess.

I am so excited! I’ve taken all my math toys out of storage and will have an ever-changing play table in my classroom where students can play and learn mathematics. Thank you, Sara Van Der Werf for inspiring me!

Now I’ll write a little about the number 1192:

  • 1192 is a composite number.
  • Prime factorization: 1192 = 2 × 2 × 2 × 149, which can be written 1192 = 2³ × 149
  • The exponents in the prime factorization are 3 and 1. Adding one to each and multiplying we get (3 + 1)(1 + 1) = 4 × 2 = 8. Therefore 1192 has exactly 8 factors.
  • Factors of 1192: 1, 2, 4, 8, 149, 298, 596, 1192
  • Factor pairs: 1192 = 1 × 1192, 2 × 596, 4 × 298, or 8 × 149
  • Taking the factor pair with the largest square number factor, we get √1192 = (√4)(√298) = 2√298 ≈ 34.52535

1192 is the sum of two consecutive prime numbers:
593 + 599 = 1192

34² +  6² = 1192

1192 is the hypotenuse of a Pythagorean triple:
408-1120-1192 calculated from 2(34)( 6), 34² –  6², 34² +  6²
It is also 8 times (51-140-149)

1192 is a cool-looking 3322 in BASE 7

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1191 Happy Birthday, Brent

Today I’m saying “Happy Birthday” to my son, Brent with a yummy but mysterious puzzle cake. I’ve made the puzzle just a little bit harder than normal.

Adding 13 to the puzzle actually makes it easier to solve, but adding 14 makes some multiples of 7 more difficult. For example, the allowable common factors of 70 and 35 are now 7 AND 5, and the allowable common factors of 28 and 56 are now 4, 7, and 14.

As always there is only one solution. I know my son can solve this puzzle, Can you?

Print the puzzles or type the solution in this excel file: 12 factors 1187-1198

Now I’ll share some facts about the number 1191:

  • 1191 is a composite number.
  • Prime factorization: 1191 = 3 × 397
  • The exponents in the prime factorization are 1 and 1. Adding one to each and multiplying we get (1 + 1)(1 + 1) = 2 × 2 = 4. Therefore 1191 has exactly 4 factors.
  • Factors of 1191: 1, 3, 397, 1191
  • Factor pairs: 1191 = 1 × 1191 or 3 × 397
  • 1191 has no square factors that allow its square root to be simplified. √1191 ≈ 34.51087

1191 is the hypotenuse of a Pythagorean triple:
684-975-1191 which is 3 times (228-325-397)

1191 is repdigit 111 in BASE 34 because
34² + 34 + 1 = 35(34) + 1 = 1191